Why Cycles launched last August and they are making a quick name for themselves in the bikepacking world. Why Cycles is focusing on titanium bikes, and now with the Wayward, they will have 4 bikes in their line. A gravel/cross bike called the R+ which we had a fantastic experience on, a slacked-out 27.5+ rig called the Supple 7, and the their dirt jumper the T.F.. The Wayward is a great complement to their fleet and we look forward to sharing an in-depth review soon.


MONDAY, MAY 8, 2017 OGDEN, UT

Why Cycles, manufacturer of titanium bikes that launched its first three models last fall, today announced the official release of its new 29+ bike, the Wayward. Why Cycles is a small company that is quickly picking up traction with their unique, “modern take on traditional titanium” bikes designed around having fun. The Wayward is the brand’s fourth model, and according to company founders, aims to be “the best 29+ bike out there.”

While the super big 29+ tires have been around the bike industry for several years now, not many manufacturers have truly embraced them, favoring instead more mainstream wheel sizes. However, Why believes their new Wayward is the solution for a frame that is designed to optimize the capabilities of this large tire size. “It’s tough to design a frame around such a big wheel,” said company co-founder Adam Miller. “So we took a different approach and really tried to design the frame’s geometry from scratch to take advantage of everything the big tires had to offer.”

According to Why, the Wayward is made from the same superior Grade 9 titanium as their other models, with the same machined 6/4 titanium integrated head tube, threaded bottom bracket shell, stealthy belt drive split, and sliding dropouts. It has extra water bottle bosses, rack and fender mounts, and according to Why’s production manager Kevin Boyer, the Wayward “rides like an extra-rad and surprisingly playful hardtail, but is also super at home loaded down with gear for a bikepacking trip.”

The Wayward is available for pre-order now with a 50% deposit, and will be available as a frame, frameset, or as two stock build options. Frames are expected to ship mid June and complete bikes will ship 2-3 weeks later. Frame price is $2249, and complete builds start at $5499. Why offers a 30 day, no-questions-asked return policy, a lifetime warranty, and ships every complete bike in an Evoc Pro travel case for the customer to keep.

More information can be found by visiting www.whycycles.com or by calling/texting the company directly at 801-698-3678.


2 Comments

  1. Some guy

    Yawn. Another “me-too” bike from some dudes with a lot of passion and some connections at a factory in Asia. I don’t see what this bike brings to the market that you can’t find from 37 other brands.

    “So we took a different approach and really tried to design the frame’s geometry from scratch to take advantage of everything the big tires had to offer.” Translation: The bottom bracket is 5mm lower.

    “Rides like an extra-rad and surprisingly playful hardtail, but is also super at home loaded down with gear for a bikepacking trip.” Sure you could DO both these things, but there’s zero chance it’s going to be really GREAT at either one of them. That’s like saying a road bike “Can win the tour de france and still be loaded down with 70 pounds of panniers.”

    I wish the bike industry would take real steps to get more people on bikes rather than trying to out-cool each other.

    • Smithhammer

      With all due respect, that’s quite the cynical assessment.

      Why frames are made abroad – true. But it’s become a tired and outdated perspective to immediately equate Asian-made frames with inferior quality. There are Asian frame makers capable of excellent quality, and it sure looks to me like Why frames are one example of that.

      As for your analogy, “That’s like saying a road bike can win the Tour de France and still be loaded down with 70 pounds of panniers,” it sounds to me like there are some gaps in your knowledge/experience base, or you wouldn’t make such an inaccurate claim. A TDF race bike and a road touring bike, designed to take 70lbs worth of racks, panniers and gear, are worlds apart – of course. But the same simply isn’t true for a stout, well-built hardtail trail bike and 20-30lbs of lightweight (by comparison) bikepacking gear. It has been my repeated experience that there are a number of good plus-sized hardtails out there that are plenty fun to ride as naked trail bikes, while still being fully capable of loading up for a few days of self-supported riding, and that there are none of the downsides one would experience loading up an utlralight road race bike for touring. Trying to equate one with the other is apples and oranges.

      I believe the “industry” as a whole, IS putting a lot of effort into getting more people out on bikes, but they are also up against a number of larger cultural forces that are discouraging people from spending more time outside and being active. It isn’t as simple as just encouraging more people to ride bikes – it’s a major uphill battle against much of what we are becoming as a culture. Impossible? I sure hope not, and I don’t think so, but it’s also a lot easier said than done. Regardless, I also don’t have the unrealistic expectation that every bike company needs to make this their primary focus. Lots of bigger companies already are – it’s ok to have niche companies as well, and not fault them for what they aren’t.

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