There is no doubt that 45NRTH is a top choice for winter cycling gear, and I would maybe go as far as to say the most popular company on the winter cycling scene at the moment. This simplistic brand focuses their products solely on winter cycling and fat biking. and it shows in the quality and thoughtfulness in the design of their products. The 45NRTH collection contains a wide spectrum of products that are intended to keep you comfortable doing what you love in the coldest days of winter. With their home in Bloomington, Minnesota, these products are developed based on the needs of the designers themselves, and are tested in extreme cold climates by developers and their stacked 45NRTH ambassador team. “We have more people who ride more miles in more cold than anywhere on the planet.” says their website. Dunderbeist and Flowbeist While their collection spans anywhere from keeping your hands warm, to fat bike specific flat pedals, their efforts in designing fat bike traction are unparalleled. We tested their newest tires, the Dunderbeist and Flowbeist, over the winter season and have been more than pleased. The Beists (as I will refer to them for the purpose of this article) are the first front and rear specific tire set that has come from 45NRTH. With the 4.6” footprint, they were just what I was looking for to rock on my Fatback Corvus which has 80mm rims. I didn’t want to have the fuss of swapping tires for varying conditions, so I wanted something like the Beists that have the versatility to hold up to a full winter season in Colorado. Dunderbeist and Flowbeist These tires remind us of the Bud and Lou from Surly in that they have a similar concept with big knobs and front and rear specific profiles. They act very similar, yet they are lighter, at the width of 4.6” versus 4.8”.  When comparing the Beists to their bigger brother, the Dillinger 5, there are pluses and minuses worth noting. While the Beists have the perfect tread pattern for cornering, their larger knobs don’t roll as well as the Dillinger. In comparison to the 45NRTH tire line up, the Beists are the best for cornering. We had confidence going into corners at speed on steeper Colorado fat bike singletrack. Dunderbeist and Flowbeist At proper tire pressure the Beists hook up to the snow extremely well in all aspects – cornering, quick turns, and climbing soft snow. On the downside of this, they just don’t roll as fast as the Dillinger, but they roll better than a Bud and Lou combo. We have used these tires both tubeless and with tubes. We set them up on a pair of Nexti rims, and they worked really well with an at-home electric inflator. Prior to setting them up tubeless we made sure that both the bead and the rim were dry. It was helpful to pre-position the tire on the rim with a tire lever so that it was as close as possible to the edge of the rim – ensuring that the tire was taut so that air wouldn’t escape when inflating. If the bead, near the bead, or the rim is wet from sealant, you will find that it is a pain to pre-seat your tire. 45NRTH’s Tubeless Ready technology, which essentially gives the bead more surface area, helps seat a tubeless setup with less headache. The Dunderbeist and Flowbeist combo is best used for grooomed or packed singletrack, fast descents, or rolling on nordic track. They are all around amazing fat bike tires for all purposes. If you ride somewhere where firm conditions are hard to come by, the more narrow profile may be less desirable, especially on an 80mm rim. However, where they lack in width, they make up for in knob size. The Beists may not be as fast rolling as some smaller knobbed tires, but they will surely get you where you are going, and with confidence to boot. Flowbeist and Dunderbeist Tech Specs and Pricing The designated flowy front tire, and the stable trusty rear tire. Size: 26 x 2.6” (55/26” MTN) Casing: 120tpi Ultralight Bead: Folding Tuebless Ready Rim Compatability: 65 – 102mm wide rims  

6 Comments

  1. Steven Koellmer

    Love seeing skis on bikes!!! Match made in heaven. I’m having a hard time fitting my skis on my bike. For one, I’m not running Dynafits like I assume you are, so I can’t turn the binding inward. Keeping my knees away from my Marker Dukes is an issue. Also, I have 140mm tips and my edges tend to scrap the top of my fork. I just can’t get the skis to be stable enough for my liking either. Do you just use Voile straps and nothing else? Are the Voile straps stable on single track? Thanks!!!

    • Neil Beltchenko
      Neil Beltchenko

      yeah, it’s a really simple set up with two of these Revelate 3G Straps. For sure it helps that they are tech bindings. These skis are more tour specific then shredding through pow, but they do work in a pinch. What is more difficult is the fact that the skis don’t move when the front wheel does, so it’s a little awkward, and may make singletrack riding difficult.

      • Steve Koellmer

        Thanks for the feedback Neil. I’m using velcro straps right now, but I’m going to get some Revelate or Voile straps for next season and see how that goes. I have a feeling that my 140-114-132 skis are just too big to attach to a bike without using a rear wheel A-Frame rack. Love seeing all the content you put out. You’re a big inspiration!

    • Marc Fortier

      I have my skis attached to the sides of my Osprey Kode backback. A little awkward initially getting on/off the bike, but easy once you figure it out, and doesn’t interfere with riding

      • Neil Beltchenko
        Neil Beltchenko

        I have also done that, works fine, just need to make sure the skis are not attached too low, to avoid tire rub.

      • Steve Koellmer

        I have a Dakine pack that has diagonal straps and side straps. The diagonal setup has good weight distribution and doesn’t rub the tires on my Krampus at all. Much preferred over side straps.

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