Earlier this summer we tested and reviewed a handful of top tube bags on the market, we compared these bags because each offer the same idea – an easy access bag for items like snacks, tools, phone, or wallet. However, top tube bags are not the only option for easy access to all those essential items. That is where a stem bag has kindly found its place in the bikepacking world. A logical location for an easy access bag has more bag manufacturers sewing and stocking them. We got our hands on Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks rendition of the stem bag called the Silo. Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo Another well thought out piece of gear by Dave Wilson, owner of Nuke Sunrise. The Silo is a circular shaped bag that fits nicely against the stem and handlebar junction. It attaches with two One-Wrap Velcro straps. Also attached is an adjustable strap on the bottom of the bag. This strap goes around the crown of the fork to give the bag more stability. It’s very similar to your handlebar strap system. Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo The bag is made of a blue Xpak outer, insulated foam core, and a bright yellow nylon interior. The bag cinches down by way of an orange cord and a toggle stop cord lock piece. The bag comes with a drainage hole at the bottom for moisture to escape. Across the outer side of the bag is a piece of webbing, that is sewn in and doubles as the installation loops and external storage loops.Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo The bag proved to be a perfect alternative to a top tube or small seat bag for everyday use. We threw our snacks, tire lever and tube, tool, and patch kit, in for our day rides. It also was a great addition on a short overnight bikepacking trip where it held every snack needed with plenty of space to spare. Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo   Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo The installation is quick and easy, and comes with different installation points to make for a perfect fit on the stem and handlebars of whatever bike you wish. We also strapped the bag directly to the bars when the stem was full, it proved to be just as stable – not sliding down the bars. The bag was also built around the Nuke Sunrise harness system, allowing to integrate one strap for both bags. It will also work on many other handlebar systems. Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo The bag in general is large, when it’s completely open, you can easily fit your hand into the bag. The bag offers one hand opening and closing, which is great when you need to keep the wheels moving. The insulated feature is great when rocking a water bottle, or beer for that matter. We are excited to test it out in the winter, to bring on our fat bike excursions in hopes that it delays the onset of our bottles freezing. Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks Silo We really enjoy the Silo. It looks great, is lightweight, and extremely functional. Whether you’re racing the Trans North California, or just need some extra cargo, it’s a perfect bag to add to your repertoire. The Silo is available in a variety of colors for $35. It is also available in Dave’s signature multi-cam at $38. Head over to the Nuke Sunrise web store or send Dave an Email at Fastmtnbiker@gmail.com

2 Comments

  1. Would be nice if Dave put a stretchy mesh pocked on one side of the bag. Drain hole is great. My Revelate feed bags turn into water bottles when it rains. A true D-shape is what’s needed. Can’t tell if the bottom strap is mounted on the front or rear side of the bag. Front side mounting of that bottom strap would help keep the bag from pushing against a bar bag, if you run one.
    Would also be nice if someone made a gas tank which was much wider at the front [tapering to the rear], to take advantage of all that wasted space around the stem and head tube [even draping down the head tube]. Need to make room for the knees, but there’s still a lot of room up there which would be used for bags.

    • Neil Beltchenko
      Neil Beltchenko

      Mesh Pocket: maybe it could be useful, were not missing it however.

      The bottom webbing is sewn in to the rear of the bag, it keeps the bag more upright, and still works well with handlebar bags.

      Jefe made a pretty unique DIY bag system similar to you description, I think it was all connected in with his handlebar system.

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